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which other arguments and other probabilities may be opposed, but consisted mainly of matters of fact, and citations out of authenticque peices and documents which could not be contradicted, and did earnestly desire me to send him some more of them, and that he intended to send some of them to the cheife ministers in France, but as to that I told him that he might save his Labour, for that it was printed there by my Lord Holles; then he said that he would give them to some people here of his acquaintance, and that in his life he never read anytbing of that kind, that gave him that reall and fundamentall satisfaction. Moreover he added, that he did not understand the conduct of these people, and that they would hazzard the late Battle, much less-that they are yett so eager for another, but yett that he saw plainly that it must come to it; he added that he supposed that since it hath pleased God so to preserve his Royall Highness in the late Battle, and that he had given him such a victory, whereby he may with that reputation now stay at home, that it would not be thought fitt to hazzard him againe. I am sure the advantage by no victory can equalise the hazzard. For certaine Bancker is putt to sea and with him 17 men of warre, and a fire ship, and 6 or 7 more were intended after him, if they could reach him in time; 8 of the old ships with him are those that came into the Texell upon the Tuesday after the fight, not having bin able to finde Obdam, and the rest are such as were little indamaged; all take it for granted that they are gone Northward, and most suppose to meet some ships of which they have notice to be upon their way and neer land, others speake also of ships to the Northward with masts, and other provision for their Navy, they say they are in great want of masts. There is a surmise as if Prince Rupert should be after them or have mett them, but I heare no ground for it, but I suppose if without doubt the Duke hath continually yauchts or ketches neer the Texell to observe their motions at all times, and which way they take, and so that he will have had notice hereof, and if they could be mett withall while abroad, or His Majesties fleet clap before the Texell, and so be betweene them and home, it would be a mighty buisiness. I know not how they would gett a fleete againe in haste; dayly new orders are made for the pre venting of the running away of their seamen, yett they are inforeed to lett them goe home by turnes, how they will gett them againe is a question. They begin againe to be alarm'd with the noise of the Bishop of Munster's gathering troops together, they promise the Spanish Ambassador that they will bnild him another ship instead of the Delfland, they say positively that they had advice that France will in 14 dayes speake out right for them in England, they speake very much of their ships lying before Tangier, and that it will not be able to hold out long for want of victualls. Many poor artists dayly quitt this

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