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180

THE IND1AN MUTINY

fact that he rather despised their terrors. Throughout the whole of that excited period there were few names, even among the chiefs of rebellion, on which fiercer denunciation was showered by Englishmen than the name of Lord Canning. Because he would not listen to the bloodthirsty clamours of mere frenzy, he was nicknamed "Clemency Canning," as if clemency were an attribute of which a man ought to be ashamed. Indeed, for some time people wrote and spoke, not merely in India but in England, as if clemency were a thing to be reprobatedx), like treason or crime. Every allowance must be made for the unparalleled excitement of such a time, and in especial for the manner in which the elementary *) passions of manhood were inflamed by the stories, happily not true, of the wholesale dishonour and barbarous mutilation of women. But when the fullest allowance *) has been made for all this, it must be said by any one looking back on that painful time, that some of the public instructors of England betrayed a fury and ferocity which no conditions can excuse on the part of civilised and Christian men who have time to reflect before they write or speak. The advices which some English journals showered upon the Government, the army, and all concerned in repressing the Mutiny, might more fittingly have come from some of the heroes of the "Spanish Fury." Nay, the SpanishFury itself was, in express words, held up to the English army as an example for them to imitate. An English paper, of high and well-earned authority, distinctly declared that such mercy as AlVa showed the Netherlands was the mercy that English soldiers must

1. to reprobate [repröubeit]: to express disapproval of.

2. elementary: a term used in chemistry for elements that cannot be further decomposed; also: belonging to the great forces of nature.

3. allowance: consideration which lessens the effect or importance of what has been brought fOrward.

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