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but indifferent thoughts of them, and that they did not fire very well. I have this post sent to secretary Morice a letter which I have this day from capitain Wilkinson late comander of the Charity in answer to one that I had written to him, and therewith I have also sent lists of all the English and Scotch that are prisoners in Amsterdam, together with the names of the respective ships in which they were taken, and I doe not finde that they are soe well used there as reported, for that there are such a great number of them kept together in one roome, and I have a letter from a Merchant at Amsterdam whom I desired to deliver my letter to Wilkinson, and to observe particularly how they were treated, and he writes me word that in point of Victualls they are not so well used as prisoners used to be there. Moreover that though he did gett once to see them, that comeing a 2d and a3d time he was refused, cuncerning which he hath complained to the burgemasters by my order, as also concerning the streightness of their lodging, which if not remedied by their removall into other places or releasement it will putt them all into sicknesse, some or other of them dayly falling, and there is no hopes of their getting better accomodation at Amsterdam, so that truly I cannot but earnestly putt you in mind that you will be pleased to bestirre your selfe for their exchange. There are also (as I am informed) about 100 prisoners at Rotterdam, I intend to gett a list of them also, but they will not suffer any English to see them or speake with them, but from a law court out of a little grate which is some stories high. My servant is returned from the Brill, and tells me he delivered the 18 boyes safe on board the pacquett boat. The merchant above said writes me word that he had seen the Charity, and that he never saw any ship so battered and torne, being as full of holes as a hony comb, and the wbole ship within bespattered with blood. The East India actions are fallen to 326 which is a strange fall, and if H. M.'s fleet putt to sea, they will yett fall lower. They are here mightyly to be comended for keeping such a number of galliotts continually at sea for advice. It is conceived that if their ships cannot gett back againe with safety that they will direct them to putt into Norway or somewhere thereabouts; in the late warre their East India ships did so once. I have this weeke given a passé to two Englishmen that lived ad Leyden and are weavers of Camblets and all kinde of shifts made of haire and haire and woolls, and they intend this weeke by way of Flanders for England. Mons.r d'Estrade told me this last weeke that he did what he could to have persuaded these people not to have putt to sea with their fleet till the issue of the mediation at London, but that they would not be prevailed with, and I am now in like manner informed that France doth make it its business to persuade them not to putt to sea againe till the issué of the said negotiation. The Harlem

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