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THE PICKWICK PAPERS

51

them incapable for the discharge of the every-day duties of ordinary life—from that contest, sir, I~will never shrink till I have set my heel upon The Eatanswill Independent. I wish the people of London, and the people of this country, to know, sir, that they may rely upon me—that I will not desert them; that I am resolved to stand'by them, sir, to the last."

"Your conduct is most noble, sir," said Mr. Pickwick; and he grasped the hand of the magnanimous Pott. fc-v

"You are, sir, I perceive, a man of sense and talent," said Mr. Pott, almost breathless with the vehemence of his patriotic declaration. "I am most happy, sir, to make the acquaintance of such.a man."

"And I," said Mr. Pickwick, "feel deeply honoured by this expression of your opinion. Allow me, sir, to introducé you to my fellow-travellers, the other corresponding members of the club I am proud to have founded."

"I shall be delighted," said Mr. Pott.

Mr. Pickwick withdrew, and returning with his friends, presented them in due form to the editor of The Eatanswill Gazette.

The noise and bustle which ushered in the morning were sufficiënt to dispel from the mind of the most romantic visionary in existence any associations but those which were immediately connected with the rapidly-approaching election. The beating of drums, the blowing of horns and trumpets, the shouting of men, and tramping of horses, echoed and re-echoed through the streets from the earliest dawn of day; and an occasional fight between the light skirmishefs of either party at once enlivened the preparations, andx) agreeably diversified their character.

"Well, Sam," said Mr. Pickwick, as his valet appeared at

1. at once.... and: as well.... as.

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